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Found 3 records.

Status: Verified (1)

RFC5598, "Internet Mail Architecture", July 2009

Source of RFC: IETF - NON WORKING GROUP
Area Assignment: app

Errata ID: 3260

Status: Verified
Type: Editorial

Reported By: Murray Kucherawy
Date Reported: 2012-06-15
Verifier Name: Barry Leiba
Date Verified: 2012-06-15

Section 4.3.1 says:

4.3.1. Mail Submission Agent (MSA)


   A Mail Submission Agent (MSA) accepts the message submitted by the
   aMUA and enforces the policies of the hosting ADMD and the
   requirements of Internet standards.

It should say:

4.3.1. Message Submission Agent (MSA)


   A Message Submission Agent (MSA) accepts the message submitted by the
   aMUA and enforces the policies of the hosting ADMD and the
   requirements of Internet standards.

Notes:

The document tends to use "Message" rather than "Mail". However, in the case of the MSA, it uses "Mail" more than "Message".

The document probably needs a pass to ensure consistent use of both terms throughout.


Status: Held for Document Update (2)

RFC5598, "Internet Mail Architecture", July 2009

Source of RFC: IETF - NON WORKING GROUP
Area Assignment: app

Errata ID: 2956

Status: Held for Document Update
Type: Technical

Reported By: Dave Crocker
Date Reported: 2011-09-03
Held for Document Update by: Peter Saint-Andre

Section 4 says:

Figure 5: Protocols and Services, MTA-hMDA list of protocols

It should say:

{{ The text in Section 4.4 cites the two, standards-track 'turn' mechanisms, but these are not listed in the MTA-hMDA link of Figure 5. }}

Notes:

Clearly this is a non-critical enhancement. Still, it would be good to add whenever the document is updated.


Errata ID: 3282

Status: Held for Document Update
Type: Editorial

Reported By: Alessandro Vesely
Date Reported: 2012-07-11
Held for Document Update by: Barry Leiba

Section 2.3 says:

Mail Service Providers (MSPs)

It should say:

either:
   Mailbox Providers (MPs)
or:
   Email Service Providers (ESPs)

Notes:

The ambiguity between the two concepts possibly indicated with similar terms is frequent. The distinction reported here is due to JD Falk, and it seems to be taking roots.


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