<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
<head>
  <meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type">
  <title></title>
</head>
<body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
Martin Duerst wrote:<br>
<blockquote cite="mid:6.0.0.20.2.20081109191506.023fcdf8@localhost"
 type="cite">
  <blockquote type="cite">
    <pre wrap="">I have serious doubts about this benefit, for two reasons.  The first is
that in protocol implementation the appearance of the characters is
often less important than the octets that get sent on the wire, and the
U+XXXX notation is far superior for this purpose.  The second is that
there is so much variation in how UTF-8 is displayed in practice, that
using UTF-8 to illustrate how something should look like when rendered
is unlikely to work well.   Images would be much better.
    </pre>
  </blockquote>
  <pre wrap=""><!---->
In the cases I know best, in particular IRIs and IDNs, the point is
exactly NOT to show what happens when UTF-8 goes over the wire.
IDNs use punycode over the wire. IRIs use characters on the side
of a bus (or wherever). In particular in these cases, it's very
helpful to have the real characters in contrast with some
ACE notation.
  </pre>
</blockquote>
but if the "real" characters aren't displayed correctly or
consistently, how is this helpful?<br>
do you expect readers to hex-dump the RFCs?<br>
<br>
Keith<br>
<br>
</body>
</html>