<html>
  <head>

    <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    The New Yorker reports[1] about how links go stale on the web, and
    how this is impacting journals and the like.  I thought it might be
    interesting to this lot in terms of how and when we cite URLs. 
    You'll note, I'm only posting a URL about the article, but in a
    spate of cruelty, the New Yorker article doesn't have a to the study
    they quote, and so I can't claim to be posting about a URL to a URL
    ;-)<br>
    <br>
    Here's the relevant quote:<br>
    <br>
    <blockquote type="cite">
      <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
      But a 2013 survey of law- and policy-related publications found
      that, at the end of six years, nearly fifty per cent of the URLs
      cited in those publications no longer worked. According to a 2014
      study conducted at Harvard Law School, “more than 70% of the URLs
      within the Harvard Law Review and other journals, and 50% of the
      URLs within United States Supreme Court opinions, do not link to
      the originally cited information.” </blockquote>
    <br>
    Eliot<br>
    <br>
    [1] <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://www.newyorker.com/?p=2960285&mbid=social_tablet_f">http://www.newyorker.com/?p=2960285&mbid=social_tablet_f</a><br>
    <br>
    <br>
  </body>
</html>