<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">You have not noticed any comment because their email bounced :-)<div><br><div><div>On Jan 11, 2012, at 10:11 AM, Dave CROCKER wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; ">On 1/10/2012 1:55 PM, Ross Callon wrote:<br><blockquote type="cite">Would it be feasible to give a similar address to RFC authors (such as<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><a href="mailto:person@author.ietf.org">person@author.ietf.org</a>)?<br></blockquote><br>I assume that your reason for suggesting this is to permit a stable contact address in RFCs? &nbsp;If not, what is the value you intend?<br><br>Since a mechanism like this would have substantial costs to develop and operate, just how significant a problem do we currently have? &nbsp;In theory, it ought to be substantial, since people do move around. &nbsp;In practice, I haven't noticed any comment about this over the years.<br></span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>