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Found 9 records.

Status: Verified (3)

RFC0791, "Internet Protocol", September 1981

Source of RFC: Legacy
Area Assignment: int

Errata ID: 716

Status: Verified
Type: Technical

Reported By: Damien Mattei
Date Reported: 2007-01-03
Verifier Name: Ralph Droms
Date Verified: 2010-12-06

Section 3.1 says:

        +--------+--------+--------+--------+
        |10001000|00000010|    Stream ID    |
        +--------+--------+--------+--------+
         Type=136 Length=4

It should say:

        +--------+--------+--------+--------+
        |10001000|00000100|    Stream ID    |
        +--------+--------+--------+--------+
         Type=136 Length=4

Rationale:

This number count the length which is 4 and not 2.
10 in binary is 2 in decimal, 100 in binary is 4 in decimal.

The option-length octet counts the option-type octet and the 
option-length octet as well as the option-data octets.(see page 15)
The length is 4 for the Stream identifier option as we have 4 bytes and 
it is well written in page 16 of RFC 791:

The following internet options are defined:

      CLASS NUMBER LENGTH DESCRIPTION
      ----- ------ ------ -----------
        0     0      -    End of Option list.  This option occupies only
                          1 octet; it has no length octet.
        0     1      -    No Operation.  This option occupies only 1
                          octet; it has no length octet.
        0     2     11    Security.  Used to carry Security,
                          Compartmentation, User Group (TCC), and
                          Handling Restriction Codes compatible with DOD
                          requirements.
        0     3     var.  Loose Source Routing.  Used to route the
                          internet datagram based on information
                          supplied by the source.
        0     9     var.  Strict Source Routing.  Used to route the
                          internet datagram based on information
                          supplied by the source.
        0     7     var.  Record Route.  Used to trace the route an
                          internet datagram takes.
        0     8      4    Stream ID.  Used to carry the stream
                          identifier.
        2     4     var.  Internet Timestamp.

Notes:

from pending


Errata ID: 579

Status: Verified
Type: Editorial

Reported By: Pavel Uvarov
Date Reported: 2004-06-16

On page 21, it says:

The intitial contents of the route data area must be zero.

It should say:

The initial contents of the route data area must be zero.

Errata ID: 583

Status: Verified
Type: Editorial

Reported By: Pavel Uvarov
Date Reported: 2004-06-16

On page 23, it says:

The intitial contents of the timestamp data area must be zero 
or internet address/zero pairs.

It should say:

The initial contents of the timestamp data area must be zero 
or internet address/zero pairs.

Notes:

Spelling error.


Status: Reported (1)

RFC0791, "Internet Protocol", September 1981

Source of RFC: Legacy
Area Assignment: int

Errata ID: 3874

Status: Reported
Type: Technical

Reported By: Bo-Jhang Ho
Date Reported: 2014-01-23

Section 3 says:

    The number 576 is selected to allow a reasonable sized data block to
    be transmitted in addition to the required header information.  For
    example, this size allows a data block of 512 octets plus 64 header
    octets to fit in a datagram.  The maximal internet header is 60
    octets, and a typical internet header is 20 octets, allowing a
    margin for headers of higher level protocols.

It should say:

    The number 576 is selected to allow a reasonable sized data block to
    be transmitted in addition to the required header information.  For
    example, this size allows a data block of 516 octets plus 60 header
    octets to fit in a datagram.  The maximal internet header is 60
    octets, and a typical internet header is 20 octets, allowing a
    margin for headers of higher level protocols.

Notes:

It is not consistent that it first give an example which illustrates the header is 64 octets, but then explains the maximum header size is 60 octets.


Status: Held for Document Update (5)

RFC0791, "Internet Protocol", September 1981

Source of RFC: Legacy
Area Assignment: int

Errata ID: 578

Status: Held for Document Update
Type: Editorial

Reported By: Yin Shuming
Date Reported: 2006-02-18
Held for Document Update by: ron bonica

Section 3.2 says:

Note that this is consistent with the the datagram total length field (of 
course, the header is counted in the total length and not in the 
fragments).

It should say:

Note that this is consistent with the datagram total length field (of 
course, the header is counted in the total length and not in the 
fragments).


Errata ID: 2295

Status: Held for Document Update
Type: Editorial

Reported By: Vishwas Manral
Date Reported: 2010-06-03
Held for Document Update by: ron bonica

Section Page 27 says:

For example, one could implement
a fragmentation procedure that repeatly divided large datagrams in
half until the resulting fragments were less than the maximum
transmission unit size.

It should say:

For example, one could implement
a fragmentation procedure that repeatedly divided large datagrams in
half until the resulting fragments were less than the maximum
transmission unit size.

Notes:

s/ repeatly/repeatedly/


Errata ID: 2294

Status: Held for Document Update
Type: Editorial

Reported By: Vishwas Manral
Date Reported: 2010-06-03
Held for Document Update by: ron bonica

Section Page 21 says:

If it is, it inserts its
own internet address as known in the environment into which this
datagram is being forwarded into the recorded route begining at
the octet indicated by the pointer, and increments the pointer
by four.

It should say:

If it is, it inserts its
own internet address as known in the environment into which this
datagram is being forwarded into the recorded route beginning at
the octet indicated by the pointer, and increments the pointer
by four.

Notes:

s/begining/beginning/g


Errata ID: 2519

Status: Held for Document Update
Type: Editorial

Reported By: Yaakov (J) Stein
Date Reported: 2010-09-14
Held for Document Update by: ron bonica

Section 3.1 says:

Total Length is the length of the datagram, measured in octets,
including internet header and data.  

It should say:

Total Length is the length of the datagram or fragment, measured in octets,
including internet header and data.  

Notes:

Section 2.3 makes it clear that during fragmentation the total length field is corrected to the length of the fragment. Wording such as "break a datagram into an almost arbitrary number of pieces" implies that "datagram" means the entire original packet. Thus, without the proposed correction, one may be led to believe that the total length contains the length of the original datagram.


Errata ID: 3074

Status: Held for Document Update
Type: Editorial

Reported By: ChengYan Wang
Date Reported: 2012-01-04
Held for Document Update by: Brian Haberman

Section 3.1 Page 12 says:

Bits   5:  0 = Normal Relibility, 1 = High Relibility.

It should say:

Bits   5:  0 = Normal Reliability, 1 = High Reliability.

Notes:

Spelling error.


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